Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘garlic’

There are people who take the whole “back to school” craze rather seriously. I know a family that makes 60-70 frozen meals before each year starts. All ladies from their clan gather to spend a day or two chopping, cooking, packaging, and labeling… Pretty impressive, hah!? I tried to accomplish something like that before our second child arrived, though baby Pea ended up being an angel (who said women are high-maintenance?) and unlike her brother devoted her infant days to snoozing.  So, my extreme food storage proved to be unnecessary.

However, with time I did appreciate all the stuff in the freezer. So, a new tradition was started.  Now we make extra and stow our favorites for the days, when there is no time to make a fresh dinner.

Here is one of those recipes.  All you need on the serving day is some bread or croutons!

Print this recipe

TOMATO BISQUE

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 8 cups chopped leaks, white and pale green parts only (about 3-4 leaks)
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 30 oz whole peeled tomatoes
  • 14.5 oz vegetable broth
  • 3/4 cup dry white wine
  • 1 tbs fresh lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 tbs chopped fresh basil leaves or 2 t dried basil leaves
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp ground pepper
  • 3/4 cup whipping cream (or half-and-half, or milk)

Yields about 9 cups of soup

DIRECTIONS:

Prepare the soup. In heavy pan, heat oil, leeks, celery, and garlic over medium-high heat; cook 8-10 min or until leaks are soft.  Add tomatoes, broth, wine, and lemon juice.  Bring mixture to a boil; reduce heat to medium-low, cover; and simmer for 30 min.  Remove from heat; add basil, salt, and pepper.  Puree soup mixture in food processor or blender until smooth.

Make ahead. Freeze in gallon or quart zip lock bags, pressing out the air and laying flat.

Serve: if frozen, thaw; heat through over low heat, stirring occasionally; add cream and simmer about 10 min or until thickened.  Do not boil.  Garnish with basil.  Serve warm.

Read Full Post »

Yesterday was our book club gathering.  Naturally, a bowl of fresh Aspirin seemed like a perfect breakfast choice this morning.  Ohmmmm… Instead I went for one of my favorite Russian dishes – farmers cheese dumplings, called “vareniki”.

More often than not vareniki are made with a bit of sugar, but I prefer a savory version.  To prove my husband (who says Russian food is bland) wrong, I added a little zing with garlic and red pepper, and used lots of dill to maintain that unique Russian flavor.   The result is a whole a lot of yum!

Print this recipe

FARMERS CHEESE DUMPLINGS

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 ¼ cups flour
  • ½ cup milk
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ tsp salt

FILLING:

  • 450 g farmers cheese
  • 1 egg
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp red pepper, ground
  • 1 cup fresh spinach
  • 4 large cloves of garlic, peeled
  • 1-2 stalks of green onion
  • 1 bunch of dill, hard stems discarded

DIRECTIONS:

Prepare the filling: combine all the ingredients and blend in a food processor to reach a smooth consistency.

Prepare the dough: in a large bowl, mix all the ingredients together.  Once incorporated, dump the dough on a floured surface and knead with your hands.

Roll the dough into a 1mm-thick sheet and cut out circles (about 3 inches in diameter) with a cookie cutter. Since we don’t have one, I used a wine glass, which worked just fine. Place about a teaspoon of filling in the middle of each circle, and fold the dough in half, pinching the ends.

Make ahead: at this point you can freeze the dumplings.  Arrange them on a floured cutting board and leave in the freezer for about 30 minutes.  After that, transfer frozen vareniki to a zip-lock bag and keep frozen for up to 3 months.

To cook: boil some water, add salt to taste.  Dump the vareniki in, and cook for about 8 minute till they float up to the surface.  Remove with a perforated spoon.

Traditionally served with butter and sour cream.  I sprinkled mine with aspirin! Crazy delicious!

If you liked this recipe, you may enjoy:

Read Full Post »

For my husband’s birthday dinner I tried to mix healthy vegetable dishes with vile butter/carb plates.  With all the health hype the most popular items, naturally, were dill biscuits, casserole, and mashed potatoes.  Of course stuffing ourselves with the Evil Mother-In-Law Corn dish didn’t make us feel guilty at all, since healthy greens (in form of bean salad and plain steamed broccoli) were dutifully added to the plates!  See full menu here.

I used to try to show off with elaborate meals when I just got interested in cooking. Having kids dramatically changed my ambitions.  Now I find the simplest recipes more and more delicious appealing. I wonder why?..

Pork shoulder is almost ideal.  It requires minimal effort during the preparation and produces the awesomest results!

Print this recipe

GARLIC-ROSEMARY PORK SHOULDER

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 bone-in pork shoulder with skin
  • 10 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 6 stems rosemary
  • salt and pepper to taste or your favorite meat seasoning /I LOVE  Goya Adobo - it’s a perfect blend of garlic, oregano, black pepper, and turmeric/

DIRECTIONS:

Don’t ask me why, but some people like crispy pork skin.  This recipe accommodates their weird tastes by higher heat in the beginning of baking and open lid and higher temperature in the end.  Otherwise, the secret of softest, most flavorful pork is in long low-temperature baking…

Generously season meat with salt and pepper or your favorite seasoning.  With a knife poke holes in the shoulder about 1 inch apart from each other.  Stuff the holes with garlic cloves and rosemary stems.  At this point the meat could be refrigerated for 24 hours, or you could bake it right away.

Preheat the oven to 425⁰ F (220⁰ C).

Position the pork shoulder in the baking pot (Dutch oven or turkey baking dish work great) skin up.

Bake at 425⁰ F for 30 min.  Cover with a lid or foil.  Lower temperature to 325⁰ F (160⁰ C).  Bake 30-40 minutes per pound.  During the last half hour of baking remove the lid and raise temperature to 350⁰ F  (175⁰ C) to crisp the skin.

Check the temperature with instant-read thermometer.  It should be at least 160⁰ F (71⁰ C).

Carve by removing the skin first.


Read Full Post »

Close

Loading ...

Sorry :(

Can't connect ... Please try again later.

%d bloggers like this: